Kyle Arndt Ph.D.

  • Research Scientist

Dr. Kyle Arndt is an Arctic scientist who is working to better understand the balance of carbon in Arctic ecosystems and how the Arctic impacts and is impacted by global climate. He studies the uptake and release of greenhouse gases in the Arctic, using in-situ data and satellite imagery. 

Dr. Arndt conducted his Ph.D. research on the North Slope of Alaska, where he studied the flux of CO2 and methane from Arctic tundra during the “shoulder seasons”, or transitions between the growing season and winter. He primarily works with eddy covariance data to estimate landscape scale carbon fluxes and is interested in using satellite imagery to upscale data and fit it into the big picture of Arctic emissions.

With the effects of climate change being felt more intensely, especially in the Arctic, Dr. Arndt is motivated to work on solutions that could prevent or reverse the consequences yet to come. He hopes to improve our understanding of climate change’s impact on one of the world’s most vulnerable ecosystems. Current data gaps limit our understanding  on the scale of changing fluxes in the Arctic, and Dr. Arndt is working to fill them to make predictions more accurate and better inform policy that protects the Arctic and its people today.

Selected Publications

Sensitivity of Methane Emissions to Later Soil Freezing in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems

Kyle A. Arndt, Walter C. Oechel, Jordan P. Goodrich, Barbara A. Bailey, Aram Kalhori, Josh Hashemi, Colm Sweeney, Donatella Zona (2019). JGR Biogeosciences.

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Snow melt stimulates ecosystem respiration in Arctic ecosystems

Kyle A. Arndt, David A. Lipson, Josh Hashemi, Walter C. Oechel, Donatella Zona (2020). Global Change Biology.

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Arctic greening associated with lengthening growing seasons in Northern Alaska

Kyle A Arndt, Maria J Santos, Susan Ustin, Scott J Davidson, Doug Stow, Walter C Oechel, Thao T P Tran, Brian Graybill and Donatella Zona (2019). Environmental Research Letters.

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