Arctic T-SLIP

Tsunamigenic SLope Instabilities Partnership: Understanding and preparing for landslide-generated tsunamis in permafrost and glacier regions

Photo by Chris Zimmerman, USGS

Team Collaborators

Landslides are a massive disturbance in terrestrial ecosystems—but along coastlines, the movement of tons of rock and soil into the water can generate tsunamis, posing life-threatening risks to nearby communities. Unfortunately, thawing permafrost and glacial melt caused by global warming have increased the potential for these types of dangerous events.

Arctic T-SLIP aims to bring together experts from academia, government agencies, and local communities to increase our understanding and preparedness of landslide-generated tsunamis in regions affected by thawing permafrost and/or melting glaciers.

The partnership evolved from a group of scientists discovering the large unstable slope in Barry Arm, Prince William Sound, Alaska in the spring of 2020. The discovery spurred the federal government to fund investigations into the hazard by increasing the USGS’ national landslide program funds. The State of Alaska also established a monitoring program and a website to inform and update the public.

In 2022, the Arctic T-SLIP is preparing a Planning Proposal to the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs “Large Project Support” to fund workshops and conferences aimed at developing several focused science projects. This includes collaborators in the US, Norway, Greenland, and Canada, for example.

Arctic T-SLIP welcomes new collaborators, please submit your interest here.

Support provided by:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
National Science Foundation (NSF)

Research area

Selected Related Publications

Detection and Assessment of a Large and Potentially Tsunamigenic Periglacial Landslide in Barry Arm, Alaska

Dai, C., B. Higman, P. J. Lynett, M. Jacquemart, I. M. Howat, A. K. Liljedahl, A. Dufresne, J. T. Freymueller, M. Geertsema, M. W. Jones, P. J. Haeussler (2020). Geophysical Research Letters

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